More with the GDAL/OGR perl bindings

So my last post talked about my struggles to finally get something saved in the database using the native perl bindings into the GDAL/OGR library. Once I got that working and pushed out the post, I immediately started loading up multiple files and playing around with the data. One thing I noticed was that it was impossible to separate different “trips” within the data without playing around with space and time. What I wanted was an easy way to flag each batch of points with a field identifying the run.

The auto-generated schema for the GPX data looks like this:

d testogr.track_points
                                              Table "testogr.track_points"
       Column       |           Type           |                               Modifiers                                
--------------------+--------------------------+------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ogc_fid            | integer                  | not null default nextval('testogr.track_points_ogc_fid_seq'::regclass)
 wkb_geometry       | geometry(Point,4326)     | 
 track_fid          | integer                  | 
 track_seg_id       | integer                  | 
 track_seg_point_id | integer                  | 
 ele                | double precision         | 
 time               | timestamp with time zone | 
 magvar             | double precision         | 
 geoidheight        | double precision         | 
 name               | character varying        | 
 cmt                | character varying        | 
 desc               | character varying        | 
 src                | character varying        | 
 link1_href         | character varying        | 
 link1_text         | character varying        | 
 link1_type         | character varying        | 
 link2_href         | character varying        | 
 link2_text         | character varying        | 
 link2_type         | character varying        | 
 sym                | character varying        | 
 type               | character varying        | 
 fix                | character varying        | 
 sat                | integer                  | 
 hdop               | double precision         | 
 vdop               | double precision         | 
 pdop               | double precision         | 
 ageofdgpsdata      | double precision         | 
 dgpsid             | integer                  | 
 speed              | double precision         | 
Indexes:
    "track_points_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (ogc_fid)
    "track_points_wkb_geometry_geom_idx" gist (wkb_geometry)

There are three fields that are completely blank: src, desc, and name. I decided to use src to identify the source of the data as the file name it came from.

First I modified my previous program to parse the command line options using Getopt::Long. I don’t use all of its power in this example, but in the past I’ve been well served by starting with that in case the script grows and mutates.

With Getopt::Long, I understand there are ways to input a list of things into the arguments. You can have multiple invocations of the same option, for example, --file mydata.gpx --file moredata.gpx, or you can input them as a comma separated list and follow the recipe in the perldoc for the module. However, I wanted to use a glob, like –file data/*.gpx, so I instead decided to just stick all the files after a double dash on the command line. So really, in the following code, I’m only using Getopt::Long to parse out a –help command! However, it’s there if I need to expand functionality in the future.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Carp;

use Geo::GDAL;
use Data::Dumper;

use Getopt::Long;
use Pod::Usage;

my $man = 0;
my $help = 0;

my @files;

my $result = GetOptions(
    'help|?' => $help,
    ) or pod2usage(2);

pod2usage(-exitval => 0, -verbose => 2) if $help;

@files = @ARGV;
...

With that, I have all of my input files in an array, and I can loop over them and store the filename in the source field in the db by using $new_feature->SetField('src',$_);, as follows:

foreach (@files){

    my $ds = Geo::OGR::Open($_);

    my $layer         = $ds->Layer($layer_name);
    my $feature_count = $layer->GetFeatureCount();
    carp "$layer_name, $feature_count";
    if ( $feature_count < 10 ) {
        next;
    }

    carp "saving $_ to pg";

    # now append each feature
    my $x = 0;
    $pg_layer->StartTransaction();
    while ( my $feature = $layer->GetNextFeature() ) {

        my $new_feature = Geo::OGR::Feature->new($defn);
        $new_feature->SetFrom($feature);

        # write the filename as the src field, for making lines later
        $new_feature->SetField('src',$_);

        my $pgf = $pg_layer->CreateFeature($new_feature);

        $x += 1;
        if ( $x % 128 == 0 ) {
            carp $x;
            # uncomment the following to crash your program
            # $pg_layer->CommitTransaction();
            # StartTransaction() seems to auto commit prior transaction?
            $pg_layer->StartTransaction(); 
            $x = 0;
        }

    }
    if ($x) {
        carp "all done, $x remaining";
        $pg_layer->CommitTransaction(); # this one doesn't crash for some reason
        carp "last transaction committed";
    }
}

That does its magic, and the database now has distinct groups of points. Now if you want to make “lines” out of those points, you can do this in PostGIS:

SELECT ST_MakeLine(wkb_geometry ORDER BY track_seg_point_id ASC) AS linegeom, src
INTO table testogr.lines
FROM testogr.track_points
GROUP BY src;

Et voila

QGIS rendering the new lines table, on top of OSM lines data

QGIS rendering the new lines table, on top of OSM lines data

Of course, that isn’t at all helpful, as I want to see speeds, not just the lines. Next step is to try to figure out how to add a measure to each point, and then collect those (X,Y,M) type points into a line with a measure dimension. I guess that will be my next post.